Which Plant Where?

 

Where?

Finding new opportunities for urban green space for the cities of tomorrow.

When?

Testing landscape plants for suitability and opportunity now, tomorrow and in decades to come.

Why?

Which Plant Where is about selecting the right plants for the right urban space with an eye on the future.

The Right Plant In The Right Place - Now and Tomorrow

The Which Plant Where program is a five-year series of research that will find out where current favourites are unlikely to thrive under the more extreme climates that Australian cities face, learn from past successes, and stress-test major landscape species to find opportunities for new species and varieties to be planted.

Download The Which Plant Where Brochure (PDF, 1.1MB)

The Latest From Our Blog

Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Spatial Data Analysis

Position Vacant: Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Spatial Data Analysis

Friday, 5 June 2020: The Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University is seeking to appoint an energetic and innovative Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Spatial Data Analysis in under the Green Cities Initiative – which plant, where, when database for growing urban space

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Webinar Slides - May 19 2020

Webinar Slides - May 19 2020

Wednesday, 20 May 2020: Download the webinar slides

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A solution to cut extreme heat by up to 6 degrees is in our own backyards

A solution to cut extreme heat by up to 6 degrees is in our own backyards

Wednesday, 11 March 2020: We have found trees and vegetation can lower local land temperatures by up to 5-6℃ on days of extreme heat.

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28 per cent of Tree Species in Canberra No Longer Suitable

28 per cent of Tree Species in Canberra No Longer Suitable

Friday, 28 February 2020: ABC News reports on the state of Canberra's urban trees.

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ABC News: The concrete jungle of Australian cities

ABC News: The concrete jungle of Australian cities

Thursday, 13 February 2020: Australian cities are increasingly becoming concrete jungles as trees and canopy coverage disappear, according to experts who warn this is contributing to an urban "heat island" effect.

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